Diehard Hanson fans spend the night outside The Queen to see 90s pop idols perform for charity

By | August 25, 2019

Delaware Online

Hanson was scheduled to perform at The Queen at 8 p.m. in 93.7 WSTW’s annual Help Our Kids Radiothon concert. For every ticket sold, $3 will go Nemours/A.I.duPont Hospital for Children, according to the radio station. Jessica Bies and Damian Giletto, Delaware News Journal

The Hansons – and their fans – are in their 30s, but still going strong

It’s been 22 years since Hanson released its hit song “MMMbop,” but the band — and its fans — are still going strong, with several of the so-called Fansons even spending the night outside The Queen in Wilmington to see the trio perform on Thursday.

“It’s not our first time doing this either, that’s the sad part,” New Yorker Kelli Fisher said, volunteering to talk for the group.

She had been camped outside the theater since 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, not for tickets, but to get a spot near the stage. She and nearly a dozen other fans were in line with chairs and blankets Thursday morning.

Hanson was scheduled to perform at The Queen at 8 p.m. in 93.7 WSTW’s annual Help Our Kids Radiothon concert. For every ticket sold, $3 will go Nemours/A.I.duPont Hospital for Children, according to the radio station.

“I would go regardless, but that’s a nice incentive,” Fisher said.

Fansons, like the Hanson brothers themselves, are now in their 30s, but haven’t lost any of their ardor for the Oklahoma pop-rock band, Fisher said.

Fisher estimated that she’s been to as many as 100 Hanson concerts, starting with her very first in New York at age 8. She’s also been to special island destination concerts in Jamaica.

She’s been following the band for so long that her relationship with the Hansons has changed, she said. While many early Hanson fans thought the brothers were cute and had crushes on them, the brothers are now married and have kids.

Now, it’s a deep appreciation for their music that keeps her coming back for more.

“I know I don’t have a chance with them,” Fisher said. “You just go for the music.

“(The concerts) haven’t changed much, because the fans are still crazy.”

She’s not the only one obsessed with their music. Among those waiting in line on Thursday were fans from Detroit, Toronto, Seattle and more.

Many have run into each other several times, at other concerts. Some of their favorite songs are among the band’s more recent, like “Joyful Noise,” which provides a good example of how much the band has matured musically.

“To be honest, I don’t think they’ll ever stop doing concerts,” Fisher said. “Because their fans are very loyal and dedicated.”