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What The Ale What the Ale: Fans come out for The Hop Jam Pub Crawl on Monday

Tulsa World

The Hop Jam beer tasting and concert will be here before you know it. The event, slated for May 22 in the Brady Arts District, will be an extravaganza of local, regional and international beers, with some great music to top it off. This year’s event will be twice the size of last year’s, with more than 60 breweries participating.
To get us in the mood, the Hop Jam team, or should I say Taylor and Zac Hanson, led a pub crawl Monday night from McNellie’s Public House to Dust Bowl and then to Fassler Hall.
Each of the venues gave out special-release pint glasses. McNellie’s featured local brews from Dead Armadillo, Dust Bowl featured beers from Marshall Brewing Co. and Stillwater’s Iron Monk Brewing Co. was served at Fassler Hall.
“This is really just a wind up for the festival. We are only a couple weeks away from the big day. We got a ton of craft beer fans out. It’s a great night to pump up the excitement for the opening band contest. We’re trying to encourage the bands to come out and get their fans voting,” said Taylor Hanson, one of the owners of the Hanson Brothers Beer Company.
The Hop Jam has an emphasis on local businesses and groups. It helps with local charities, musicians and brewers, but it also draws attention to Tulsa with visitors from all over the world.
Headlining the 2016 Hop Jam will be indie-folk band Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros. The lineup will also feature The Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond Jr., alt-rock band X Ambassadors and Tulsa singer-songwriter John Moreland.
The concert is free. To purchase tickets to the beer tasting or to vote for your favorite band in The Hop Jam Opening Band Contest, go to thehopjam.com. Voting ends at midnight Friday.
Local breweries scheduled to be at Hop Jam include:
405 Brewing
Anthem Brewing
Black Mesa Brewing
Choc Beer
COOP Ale Works
Dead Armadillo Brewing
Elk Valley Brewing
Hanson Brother Beer
Iron Monk Brewing
Kolibri Ale Works
Marshall Brewing
Mustang Brewing
Nothings Left Brewing
Prairie Artisan Ales
Roughtail Brewing
The Willows Family Ales



20 YEARS OF ‘MMMBOP’: TAYLOR HANSON REFLECTS ON THE GIGANTIC HIT

Fuse

With the smash single is now two decades old, the middle Hanson discusses growing up in the spotlight, what he’d be doing without it and whether “MMMBop” ever annoys him

LONDON, ENGLAND - JULY 04: (UK TABLOID NEWSPAPERS OUT) Zac Hanson, Taylor Hanson and Isaac Hanson of Hanson attend the Europe

Dave Hogan/Getty Images

It’s hard to believe that Taylor, Isaac and Zac Hanson started playing music over 20 years ago. What’s even harder to believe is how Hanson’s hit song “MMMBop” has stood the test of time throughout the last two decades. While the Hanson brothers have pursued music since their 1996 demo album MMMBop, they’ve been able to capitalize on the success of their first hit constantly throughout the past 20 years. They even created a beer called Mmmhops based off of their iconic track.

In honor of the 20th anniversary of the band’s demo album and hit song, we spoke with Taylor Hanson—now 33, and having spent well over half of his life living with a certain smash—about the meaning of “MMMBop,” navigating the group’s career and how the song shaped their entrepreneurial spirits.

FUSE: It’s 20 years since “MMMBop” came out. Can you believe it’s been that long?
HANSON: Time is a strange thing—it definitely catches you off-guard when you realize that time can pass like that. We still love what we do—we’ve been able to play music for more than two decades.

The one interesting thing is the anniversary this year is 20 years since we made the MMMBop independent record. It was made for local fans here in Oklahoma. No one knew it existed outside of that little group. A summer later, we were introducing ourselves to the world. I think it’s a cool time to reflect on where we were at 20 years ago—thinking about being 13 at the time and making a record in a garage, crafting songs, dreaming of impacting the world with your ideas and believing in something. To be 20 years after that and to have lived such a challenging, but really rewarding, life as a musician is pretty incredible.

When I was a kid, “MMMBop” didn’t really have a meaning to me. To you guys, what did it mean then, and what does it mean now?
Musically, the song started as a background part. The chorus was meant to be a background part, but the part was too catchy to be a background part. The story of the verses and the song is really about how we were seeing relationships with each other and our friends be challenged by the fact that we were choosing to dedicate ourselves to this music thing as kids. The song talks about how relationships come and go and few things last.

The chorus is like C’est La Vie: You can’t change these things. You have to celebrate what you can control. What you do control is finding the things that matter and making them important. It’s a pretty serious subject. In a way, that song is a great metaphor for how we’ve done things and how we write. We’re always optimistic, but if you look within the songs there’s a challenge or a real issue, but we’re looking for a way through it. Music is a great mechanism to pull through.

Twenty years later, do you get annoyed talking about the song?
As a lifelong entrepreneur, you always want people to get interested in new things, but we’re really proud of “MMMBop” and its story. We’re always striving for introducing people to new music. I would say, it’s not about not wanting to talk about “MMMBop,” but you want to talk about where you’re going.

Do you think the success of “MMMBop” made you guys grow up faster than you would have?
Well, we were choosing to grow up—otherwise you wouldn’t have heard our songs. So, yes, choosing music as a career as kids makes you grow up faster, but we chose it because it’s who we are. The idea of not working towards that at that time would have been more toxic and more destructive than anything. I think we’ve been blessed and lucky that we’ve been able to take that chance and have some success with it. Whatever path you take has its pluses and minuses. It’s really been a hell of a ride.

Do you guys listen to “MMMBop” while drinking your beer, Mmmhops? If so, did the beer taste better with the song?
Actually, we have. Everything is a little bit better with an Mmmhops in your hand—as long as you’re of age.

Personally, if you didn’t see the success of “MMMBop,” what do you think you would have been doing?
Well, music and creativity is in the blood, so if we didn’t have that breakout success as a band, I can’t imagine that we wouldn’t be doing music or other creative endeavors. I love design and music. There would be some creative expression out there, but it might look a little different.



Sharing Life: An Arkansas girl reflects on Hanson as ‘Mmmbop’ turns 20

THV11

There were songs, and there were songs. There were the ones that shaped the way we thought, or the way we interpreted the quirks and bumps of adolescence. There were the ones that would get stuck in our heads for days at a time. There were the ones that would make us forever fans of the musicians who wrote it. These are the ones that are remembered. For me, as a 30-year-old woman unashamed of her love of music, no matter the band, there’s Hanson’s “Mmmbop.”

The first time I heard the song, which in its original form turns 20 years old this week, I was a fifth grader.  A fifth-grader who hadn’t had many crushes on boys yet (unless you count JTT on Home Improvement), a fifth-grader who really only listened to the music her brother or parents listened to.

“Mmmbop” appeared on MTV’s Total Request Live one afternoon and when my older and way cooler teenage brother and I heard the song begin, we both just stared at the tube TV in our living room. We listened to the entire song and I was hooked.

With a few pokes and prods (read: years of teasing) from my brother about my sudden and unashamed obsession over these three brothers, the CD was mine as soon as I could make it so, and posters and cutouts from Teen Beat magazines laced every inch of my bedroom walls.

 

For me, working my way into teenage-hood, there was something more than just a catchy chorus that drove most adults insane.

It was hope. Hope for me, as a creative, quiet kid who dreamed of being known for something at a young age. Three kids under the age of 16 were following their dreams, and doing a really good job at it.

I didn’t stop at Hanson’s first album; I’ve followed them ever since, and have even met them a few times.  It was an admitted obsession as a child that turned into just simply being a fan.

With nine studio albums under their belts, three live albums, six documentaries and live performance films, these guys seem to really know what they’re doing. They skirted out of the incredibly bright limelight around 2000 when they began releasing music on their own label and snagging positions on the independent charts.

The entrepreneurs brew their own beer (Which, by the way, my now-husband drove to the brothers’ hometown of Tulsa to pick up for me one birthday a few years back, just so I could have the bottles), and even host a yearly event called “Hop Jam,” set for next weekend. This year’s headliner is Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeroes.

They’re advocates of the fight against in HIV/AIDS and poverty in Africa, and host one-mile walks to support the cause in every city they tour. …I’ve been on a couple; they’re really quite fun!

To learn more about what Hanson is up to, click here.

If you haven’t heard their recent music, I think it’s worth a listen.  I put together this playlist for anyone who is curious what Hanson’s like these days.

 



90s Singer: Existence Hanson Brothers Band

BINTANG

(Translated using Google Translate)

 

Bintang.com, Jakarta For those of you who grew up in the 90s definitely satisfied with diverse music. One of the musicians who get enough attention in this age group is the origin brothers Oklahoma, United States Hanson.

Hanson itself consists of Isaac (guitar, bass, piano, vocals), Taylor (keyboards, piano, guitar, drums, vocals) and Zac (drums, piano, guitar, vocals). In addition the band also has some additional players who helped them perform on stage.

Hanson himself also became one of the bands that are popular in Indonesia. Their single entitled MMMMBop became an idol because the lyrics are unique, especially in the chorus.

Hanson (via bbc.co.uk)

In 1997, Hanson success with the album titled Middle of Nowhere. On May 6, 1997 they even reach sales of 10 million copies around the world for the album.

May 6, 1997 Date of himself declared as Hanson Day by Oklahoma Governor Frank Keating at that time. Although only intended for once, but the fans Hanson Hanson Day celebrated on May 6 every year.

Currently Hanson itself is still active career with a final album titled Anthem was released in 2013 ago. Hanson itself also has long been under the auspices of an independent label for the song material rejected by the previous label.

Kangen band Hanson brothers Oklahoma origin? Yuk instantly enjoy their hits called MMMBop through the lyrics below.

Oh oh oh oh oh
Yeah

You have so many relationships in this life
Only one or two will last
You go through all the pain and Strife
Then you turn your back and they’re gone so fast
Oh yeah
And they’re gone so fast, yeah
Oh
So hold on the ones who really care
In the end they’ll be the only ones there
And when you get old and start losing your hair
Tell me who will still care
Can you tell me who will still care?
Oh care

Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du
Yeah
Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du
Yeah

Oh yeah
In an Mmmbop they’re gone
yeah yeah

Plant a seed, plant a flower, plant a rose
You can plant any one of Reviews those
Keep planting to find out the which one grows
It’s a secret no one knows
It’s a secret no one knows
Oh, no one knows

Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du, yeah
Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du, yeah

Oh
oh yeah

In an mmm bop they’re gone
Oh yeah oh
In an mmmbop they’re gone
In an mmm bop they’re not there
In an mmmbop they’re gone
In an mmm bop they’re not there
In an mmmbop they’re gone
In an mmmbop they’re not there
In an mmmbop they’re gone
In an mmmbop they’re not there
Until you lose your hair
Oh
But you do not care

Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du, yeah
Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du, yeah

Yeah
Oh yeah oh oh
So hold on the ones who really care
In the end they’ll be the only ones there
And hen you get old and start losing your hair
Tell me who will still care
Can you tell me who will still care?
Oh care

Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du, yeah
Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du, care

Can you tell me? oh
No you can not ’cause you do not know
Can you tell me? oh
You say you can but you do not know
Can you tell me? oh
(Which flower’s going to grow?)
No you can not ’cause you do not know
Can you tell me? oh
(If it’s going to be a daisy or a rose?)
You say you can but you do not know
Can you tell me? oh
(Which flower’s going to grow?)
No you can not ’cause you do not know
Can you tell me? oh
You say you can but you do not know
Oh yeah
You say you can but you do not know
You dont know
You dont know, oh

Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba duba dop
Ba du, yeah
Mmmbop, ba duba dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du bop, ba du dop
Ba du, care

Oh
Can u tell me? oh
No you can not ’cause you do not know
Can u tell me? oh
You say you can but you do not know
Can u tell me? oh
No you can not ’cause you do not know
Can u tell me?
You say you can but you do not know

 



John Fullbright, Jimmy LaFave, J.D. McPherson, John Moreland and more to play May 20 Tulsa concert celebrating Bob Dylan

NewsOK

TULSA – The Bob Dylan Archive announced today that Tulsa’s iconic Cain’s Ballroom, 423 N Main, will host a concert celebrating Bob Dylan on Friday, May 20.

Produced and curated by renowned Oklahoma musician and producer Steve Ripley, “On a Night Like This” will feature 30 artists who will perform some of Dylan’s greatest hits. Tickets go on sale Friday.

“I’ve been fortunate to have worked with a lot of great people in the music business,” said Ripley in a news release. “The Tractors project was by far the biggest success of the things I’ve done, but, for me, all of that pales in comparison to having played guitar with Bob. The show at Cain’s will be an evening of celebrating Bob’s music. We’ll be there to serve those songs. I can’t imagine any other thing that would have pulled me ‘out of retirement’ from down on the farm.”

As previously reported, The Bob Dylan Archive was acquired in March by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and The University of Tulsa under the stewardship of TU’s Helmerich Center for American Research. Comprised of more than 6,000 items spanning nearly 60 years of Bob Dylan’s unique artistry, career and worldwide cultural significance, the archive includes decades of never-before-seen handwritten manuscripts, notebooks and correspondence; films, videos, photographs and artwork; memorabilia and ephemera; personal documents and effects; unreleased studio and concert recordings; musical instruments and many other items.

Catching the attention of fans and media worldwide, The Bob Dylan Archive and Guthrie Green teamed up to develop the concert as a way for fans to experience a Dylan-filled night and fulfill the appetite of many who are anxious to be a part of this historic event in Tulsa.

“The staff of GKFF and Guthrie Green are thrilled to work with Steve Ripley to produce this concert,” said Stanton Doyle, senior program officer at the foundation, in the news release. “As curator, he has put together an incredible house band and, combined with the lineup of the best Oklahoma artists, the concert should truly be remarkable. We anticipate this concert will draw an audience from around the region.”

The concert has a talented lineup of artists from across the region:

  • The House Band including Steve Ripley, John Fullbright, Fats Kaplan, Davey Faragher, Pete Thomas, Terry Ware, Daniel Walker, Jimmy Karstein, and the McCrary Sisters
  • Special performances by John Fullbright, Jimmy LaFave, J.D. McPherson, John Moreland, Elizabeth Cook, Red Dirt Rangers, and many more

“To sing Bob Dylan songs just blocks away from his hero Woody’s words and in soulful Tulsa, Oklahoma makes for a pretty potent rock and roll cocktail,” said LaFave in the release. “Mama take this badge off of me. I am honored to be a part of the tribute.”

Doors will open at 7 p.m. with the show beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $30 in advance and $35 on the day of the show. Tickets will be available at the Cain’s Ballroom box office and at www.cainsballroom.com.

About Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan is one of the world’s most influential and groundbreaking artists. In the decades since he first burst into the public’s consciousness via New York City’s Greenwich Village folk music scene in the early 1960s, Bob Dylan has sold more than 125 million records around the world and amassed a singular body of work that includes some of music’s most popular and acclaimed songs and recordings. He continues to traverse the globe each year, performing nearly 100 concerts annually in front of audiences who embrace his new creations with the same fervor as his earlier work. Bob Dylan was honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States’ highest civilian honor, in 2013 and the National Medal of Arts in 2009. He was awarded a special Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for “his profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power.”

He is also the recipient of France’s Officier de la Legion d’honneur, Sweden’s Polar Music Award, doctorates from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and Princeton University, as well as numerous other honors. In recent years, his success as an author and visual artist has further burnished his popularity and acclaim. For more information, go tobobdylan.com.

About The Bob Dylan Archive
In 2016, George Kaiser Family Foundation and The University of Tulsa acquired The Bob Dylan Archive. The Archive is permanently housed in Tulsa, under the stewardship of TU’s Helmerich Center for American Research. Comprised of more than 6,000 items spanning nearly 60 years of Bob Dylan’s unique artistry, singular career and worldwide cultural significance, the archive includes decades of never-before-seen handwritten manuscripts, notebooks and correspondence; films, videos, photographs and artwork; memorabilia and ephemera; personal documents and effects; unreleased studio and concert recordings; musical instruments and many other items. Ultimately, a permanent exhibit space for the archive will be designated near the Woody Guthrie Center in Tulsa’s Brady Arts District, which houses a museum dedicated to American folksinger and Oklahoma native Woody Guthrie. Guthrie was one of Dylan’s most significant early influences, even inspiring one of Dylan’s first tracks, “Song to Woody” on his 1962 self-titled album. To learn more about the Bob Dylan Archive, go to  bobdylanarchive.com.

-BAM



Hear Cheap Trick Drummer’s New Song With Guided by Voices’ Robert Pollard

Rolling Stone

Cheap TrickHear Cheap Trick drummer Bun E. Carlos and Guided by Voices singer/songwriter Robert Pollard team up on “Do Something Real.” Mike Graham

Cheap Trick are all set to celebrate their history at tonight’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction, where the Illinois power-pop legends will take the stage to play a few of their classic songs. If all goes as planned, the performance will feature a reunion with drummer Bun E. Carlos — who hasn’t toured with the group since 2010 — but the nostalgia trip ends there. Cheap Trick, sans Carlos, hit the road April 10th in support of their new album; Carlos, meanwhile, is set to release his first solo LP, the guest-studded Greetings From Bunezuela!, this summer. Below you can stream the first single, “Do Something Real,” written and sung by Guided by Voices mastermind Robert Pollard.

Carlos’ friendship with the famously prolific indie-rock songwriter dates back to 1999, when Cheap Trick opened for Guided by Voices at several East Coast shows. “Cheap Trick and Guided By Voices have toured together,” Carlos told Rolling Stone. “I’ve played cowbell with GBV four shows in a row, and I DJ’d at GBV gigs in Chicago a couple of times.”

Like all the tracks on Greetings From Bunezuela!, “Do Something Real” is a remake of a previously recorded song, and the drummer knows Pollard’s vast catalog well enough that he chose to revive a relative obscurity: The catchy, hard-driving cut originally appeared on Speak Kindly of Your Volunteer Fire Department, Pollard’s 1999 album with multi-instrumentalist Doug Gillard. “I’m an average GBV fan with about 200–300 of their songs in my collection,” Carlos says. “I had about 15 GBV songs I thought about covering, and ‘Do Something Real’ kept coming back to me. … I could have done an entire album with Robert Pollard alone.”

Pollard is clearly flattered to have been tapped for the project. “It was a pleasure,” he told Rolling Stone of working with Carlos. “Secondly, it was an honor. To me, it’s like working with Ringo Starr. That’s how important Bun E. Carlos’s work with Cheap Trick is to me. It’s like I’ve been included in to rock royalty.”

The rest of the album features a revolving cast of frontmen, an intriguing assortment that includes Wilco bassist John Stirratt, Soul Asylum’s Dave Pirner, roots-rock luminary Alejandro Escovedo and original Cheap Trick vocalist Randy “Xeno” Hogan, among others. “I pretty much own the catalog of every singer featured on the album,” Carlos says, “and I’ve recorded or toured with every singer on the album.”

Some of the guests, such as Pollard and Escovedo, sing their own previously recorded songs on Bunezuela!; others, like the brothers of Hanson and Eleventh Dream Day’s Rick Rizzo, reinterpret vintage tracks by the Who, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Them, and others.

According to Carlos, the concept for the record has been in the works for decades. “I talked about a covers album since 1978,” he says. “After 35 years, I’m finally making this record.” Accordingly, he took an old-school approach: “I made the album like people made records in my childhood. I cut two tracks at a time.”

Greetings From Bunezuela! will be out June 24th. You can view the preliminary list of tracks and guest vocalists below.

1. “Do Something Real” — Robert Pollard (Robert Pollard solo)
2. “Him or Me” — featuring Hanson (Paul Revere and the Raiders)
3. “Armenia in the Sky” — John Stirratt (The Who)
4. “I Love You No More” — Alex Dezen (The Blackstones)
5. “Tell Me” — Alejandro Escovedo (The Rolling Stones)
6. “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry” — Dave Pirner (Bob Dylan)
7. “Let the Mystery Be” — Xeno (Iris DeMent)
8. “Idea” — Robert Pollard (The Bee Gees)
9. “Le Cactus” — Nicholas Tremulis (Jacque DuTronc)
10. “I Can Only Give You Everything” — Rick Rizzo (Them)
11. “Slow Down” — Alejandro Escovedo (Alejandro Escovedo)
12. “Count on Me” — Xeno (Fra Lippo Lippi)
13. “I Don’t Mind” — Alex Dezen (Alex Dezen)

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/hear-cheap-trick-drummers-new-song-with-guided-by-voices-robert-pollard-20160408#ixzz45Iftyhbt
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What Happened To The Group Hanson – Recent Updates

Gazette Review

“One-hit wonder”, the term most people I talked to used when describing Hanson, usually invokes images of an obscure musical act hitting it big and then fading into the oblivion of average, everyday, non-celebrity life with the rest of us. However, as illustrated by the careers of the Hanson brothers, the fact that they will never likely be as famous as they once were doesn’t mean that they have given up on their trade.

The Beginning of Hanson

The Hanson trio of Isaac, Taylor and Zac, three siblings, began their professional music careers in 1992, while the oldest of them (Isaac) was only 11, and the youngest (Zac) being at the tender age of 6. They performed at different venues and gained a moderate level of notoriety not only due to their youthfulness but also their genuine talents since, in addition to being able to sing, the boys were also skilled in musical instruments – with Isaac playing guitar, Taylor keyboard and Zac drumming – and all three having a background on the piano. While shopping for a record deal they were turned down by a number of companies due to a general lack of faith many people have in child bands, as some suspected them of being “either a novelty or fraud”, but eventually, after a couple of independent album releases and staying diligent in touring and doing live performances, Hanson finally scored a contract with Mercury Records in 1996.hanson-mmmbop-now

This deal turned out to be a major, perhaps unexpected-in-magnitude success for all parties involved, because Hanson’s first album under Mercury, Middle of Nowhere (1997), featured the remake of a song, MMMBop, that Hanson had previously recorded on their own but redid to be featured on this new, mainstream project. MMMBopwent on to become one of the biggest singles of the 90s – amazingly reaching number 1 in 27 countries – and was the primary impetus behind Middle of Nowhere, an album that, including their smash hit, was “written entirely by the (very young) Hanson brothers”, selling over 10 million copies worldwide and receiving three Grammy nominations. And the Hanson boys, who favored a long-hair, rural look (hailing from Oklahoma, a place more associated with farms than music) instantly became pop icons and actually performed on America’s biggest music stage, the Grammy Awards, in 1998.

The Fall of Hanson

It’s easy to argue that Hanson’s dip in popularity was due to what seems to inevitably happen to all mega-successful boy bands, in that they started to age, and fans started to lose interest. However Hanson never had a legitimate chance to perpetuate their standing at the top due to internal issues at their record label, which is perhaps the worst nightmare of any popular music artist. Hanson re-released an indie album they put together in 1996, this time under Mercury Records in 1998, but by the time they had completed a collection of new material in 2000, entitled This Time Around, Mercury had merged with the Island Def Jam Music Group, and Island Def Jam apparently were not overly interested in promoting Hanson. As such album sales were low, and the label even refused to fund Hanson’s accompanying tour, which of course didn’t help in bigging up the album nor the group in general. However Hanson still went on tour to push This Time Around in 2000 – using their own money – and this state of affairs pretty much set the tone for what was to become of the rest of their careers.

What’s Hanson Doing Now in 2016? Recent Update

Hanson Now in 2016 - Updated Picture
Hanson Now in 2016 – Updated Picture

Hanson is a group that, despite striking gold at an age when most of us were in middle school and now being grown men, are still dedicated to the passions of their childhood. The Hanson brothers went from being an unsigned pre-pubescent boy band to reaching a level of success so significant that they even have an annual holiday in their honor – that is still practiced to this day – in their hometown of Tulsa, Oklahoma, to once again being independent artists, though now signed to a label that they founded and own. It’s improbable that Hanson will ever reclaim the level of phenomenal success they had in the 1990s, but since then they have amassed a catalog consisting of 8 albums that were able to make it onto the US Billboard top 40, even though most of those projects were independent, including their most recent one, Anthem (2013), as well as maintaining a robust and devoted fan base.

Hanson still tours, most recently in 2015 during the Roots & Rock N’ Roll Tour which they headlined. Despite the fact that they are only in their 30s, Hanson has been around for so long that some of their current fans weren’t even born when MMMBop was released and don’t even know how the song sounds. Hanson has also put their previous writing success to use by co-writing the songs of other musicians and have also been featured on a couple of albums by popular artists in 2015, in addition to regularly making television appearances and staying devoted to promoting international charity events, some of which they established themselves.

However at the end of the day being devoted husbands and fathers, with all of the brothers now being married and having a total of 11 children between them, as well as ever-diminishing popularity has minimized Hanson’s involvement in the music industry. In spite of this they have been able to capitalize on their notoriety in recent times by using their already-established brand to delve into other business ventures, selling products as diverse as guitars to board games to beer, and we can expect going into 2016 and beyond that the trio will remain at least marginally active in the music industry, as there has even been talk of the sons of the Hanson brothers eventually forming their own band.



From Britney to the Backstreet Boys, 5 Millennial Jukebox Musicals We’d Love to See

Theater Mania

Jersey Boys, Beautiful — The Carole King Musical, and On Your Feet! Broadway is awash in musicals highlighting pop music of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s. As millennials (Americans born between 1982 and 2004) come into adulthood, Broadway producers might want to consider a new crop of jukebox musicals celebrating the glory years of this largest generation in American history. With that in mind, we propose five new jukebox musicals drawn from the turn-of-the-millennium pop renaissance.

5. Now That’s What I Call Musical! One Hit Wonders @ the Turn of the Century. 
Remember those compilation CDs they used to sell during commercial breaks fromFelicity? Imagine one of those, but onstage: “Mmmbop,” “Barbie Girl,” and “Mambo No. 5” all wrapped into one undeniably insane musical. One anticipates such a show would accompany a magical Broadway season, capped off with a Tony Awards performance of Sisqó’s “Thong Song.” Of course, it would take a very creative book writer to shoehorn so many disparate songs and styles into a coherent plot, which is why we nominate Seth Rudetsky, who seems to have mastered the special lunacy of the form in his new musical, Disaster!



Enter the Opening Band Contest for a chance to play at The Hop Jam

Tulsa World

HOP JAM

Taylor, Zac and Isaac Hanson will host the third annual The Hop Jam festival in May in the Brady Arts District. TOM GILBERT/Tulsa World

More than 20 bands have already entered the Opening Band Contest for a chance to play at the Hop Jam Beer and Music Festival in May.

The festival is hosted by Tulsa’s own Hanson brothers. It is their third year to have the event in the Brady District.

The 2016 Hop Jam will be bigger than ever, with more music and more beer than previous years.

Headlining the 2016 Hop Jam will be indie-folk band Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. The lineup will also feature The Strokes guitarist Albert Hammond Jr., alt-rock band X Ambassadors and Tulsa singer-songwriter John Moreland.

Like the previous two years, Hanson and the Tulsa World are hosting an Opening Band Contest, soliciting submissions from Oklahoma bands that want to open the Hop Jam festival.

The event is set for May 22 and admission is once again free. Tickets can be purchased for beer sales, and VIP packages will be available. It will include brewers from 20 states and more than 10 countries, including most if not all of the brewers in Oklahoma.

The Guthrie Green will be incorporated into this year’s festival, creating an all-ages family area with kids activities throughout the downtown park.

Of the submissions to the Opening Band Contest, five will be chosen as finalists by Hanson. Voting by the public will commence, and the winning band will open the show on the main stage of the festival. The other four bands will play on the Guthrie Green stage.

Submissions may be made at tulsaworld.com/hopjam. Submissions will close at 11:59 p.m. April 18. Once the finalists are chosen, voting will begin April 25 and close May 6.

Fans will get a preview of the festival with the five bands in the running playing Fassler Hall for the Hop Jam Pub Crawl, set for May 2. More details on the Pub Crawl will be announced.



Hanson: 20 years after “MMMBop” – The Zac, Taylor & Isaac make today

Purestars (DE)

Translated using Google Translate

“MMMBop” was THE catchy nineties and the big break of three brothers from Oklahoma. Today the “Hanson” have grown up – the seen and heard!
Nearly 20 years have passed since that the demo version of the song “MMMBop” has come out. And then, our three “Hanson” -Brüder missed therefore the ultimate catchy and had for months become indispensable in the charts. On the occasion of the great “MMMBop” -Jubiläums said the band that exists today with the “Vulture” magazine on the mega-hit of the nineties – also about the fact that the chorus was always sung incorrectly by most …

“MMMBop” – no one could sing the chorus!

“People can not really sing the chorus. In most cases, they stress it wrong,” said Isaac Hanson (35), the oldest of the bunch, in an interview. with the right emphasis – – Nevertheless, the brothers have a good “MMMBop” cover will be happy mad.

“MMMBop” was the biggest chart success of three Hanson brothers.
But what they have driven really by their great success with the album “Middle of Nowhere” in 1997? Anyway, everything else than to relax! The “Hanson” -Brüder have produced by their debut six more albums, the last in 2013. Today they sound experimental and adult. And these are the guys from Tulsa, Oklahoma also become!

Zac, Taylor & Isaac – fathers instead teen idols

Zac Hanson (30) – the band chick – is now married for almost ten years and has three children. Taylor Hanson (33) married his dream girl in 2002. The couple has no fewer than five children. Even Isaac is about ten years under the hood and also a father of three. Still, the three brothers making music together – but before a smaller audience. But big stadium tours were given the completed private life of the three probably difficult to implement …

How do the brothers have changed in the last 20 years, you can see in our gallery.